“FREAK” Flaw Threatens Security For Google And Apple Users

By | March 4, 2015

"FREAK" Flaw Threatens Security For Google And Apple Users

According to Washington Post, technology companies are scrambling to fix a major security flaw that for more than a decade left users of Apple and Google devices vulnerable to hacking when they visited millions of supposedly secure Web sites, including Whitehouse.gov, NSA.gov and FBI.gov.

Called “FREAK” (Factoring Attack on RSA-EXPORT Keys), the vulnerability stems from a U.S. government policy that once prevented companies from exporting strong encryption, requiring them to instead create weak “export-grade” products to ship to customers outside of the United States. 

These restrictions were lifted more than a decade ago, but the weaker encryption has continued to be used by software companies as a result of the old policy and it has even been built into software in the U.S. The existence of lingering “export-grade” encryption was unnoticed until this year, when researchers found they could force browsers to use lower-grade 512-bit encryption and then crack it. 

Researchers discovered in recent weeks that they could force browsers to use the weaker encryption, then crack it over the course of just a few hours. Once cracked, hackers could steal passwords and other personal information and potentially launch a broader attack on the Web sites themselves by taking over elements on a page, such as a Facebook “Like” button.

The researchers who discovered the flaw have notified government sites and major technology companies to fix the issue before it became widely publicized. FBI.gov and Whitehouse.gov have been fixed, and according to Apple spokeswoman Trudy Miller, Apple is preparing a security patch that will be “in place next week for both its computers and its mobile devices.”

See also

Researchers find new FREAK security flaw, Apple says fix coming soon 

“FREAK” flaw undermines security for Apple and Google users, researchers discover 

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